10 Rajasthani Dishes You Will Find at a Marwari Wedding

Rajasthan is the land of rajas and ranis; and their food is just as royal. So of course, every Marwari wedding would be subject to a delicious platter of mouth-watering Rajasthani dishes. Though a Marwari wedding mainly consists of vegetarian dishes, they may also have select non-veg items. Let’s have a look at some of them:

 

DAL BAATI CHURMA

This is just about the most famous Rajasthani/Marwari dish. The spicy dal (lentils) and sweet churma make the perfect balanced meal and taste great eaten with baati (deep-fried unleavened bread).

DAL BAATI CHURMA

 

RAJASTHANI KADHI

It is a delicious side dish made from yoghurt, gram flour and spices. It is similar in consistency to kadhi from other states like Maharashtra but is much spicier. It is a light and healthy Rajasthani dish that goes well with rice.

RAJASTHANI KADHI

 

METHI BAJRA POORI

Methi bajra pooris make a great starter for any event. They are basically deep-fried puffed bread made with fenugreek leaves and millet flour. They don’t absorb much oil and are healthy!

METHI BAJRA POORI

 

SHAHI GATTE

Gatte refers to besan (gram-flour) dumplings. The dish is made by stuffing the dumplings with mawa and dry fruits, and then dipping it in a rich yoghurt gravy.

SHAHI GATTE

 

KER SANGRI

 This dish is a delectable combination of berries and beans. It is essentially a traditional Rajasthani sabzi that’s made with ker berry and sangria bean. It is spicy and can be eaten as a pickle.

KER SANGRI

 

GATTE KA PULAO

This is another delicious Rajasthani or Marwari dish that can be eaten as a main. It is also called Gatte Ki Khichdi or Ram Pulao. The gatta, as mentioned earlier is made from besan (gram/chick-pea flour) and added to rice along with select seasonings. Tastes best with chilled yoghurt/curd.

GATTE KA PULAO

 

LAAL MAAS

This is essentially a meat curry. It is a Rajasthani dish that is prepared with mutton in a spicy gravy of curd, spices like red chillies, garlic and other flavours. It is as spicy as it is delicious! Eaten best with bajra roti.

LAAL MAAS

 

MAWA KACHORI

This is an exotic Marwari dessert from Rajasthan. It is a sort of puffed pastry that is deep-fried, filled with mawa and dry fruits, and coated with sugar syrup.

MAWA KACHORI

 

GHEVAR

This one is yet another festive, traditional Marwari/Rajasthani dish. A dessert comprising of a disc-shaped sweet cake soaked in sugar syrup. It has different varieties such as plain ghevar, malai ghevar and mawa ghevar.

GHEVAR

 

BALUSHAHI

This Rajasthani dessert is similar to a doughnut in shape but different in taste and texture. They are crunchy and deep-fried, made from maida-flour, and coated in sugar syrup along with select toppings. Perfect endings to any festive meal.

BALUSHAHI

 

 

Image credits: sharmis passions; maayeka; pankaja bhadouria; foodscape; my ginger garlic kitchen

Sahil & Anania Delhi : Resplendent Punjabi Wedding Held In Delhi

Anania and Sahil – with names so poetic, could their wedding be anything less than stunning? The two recently tied the knot in Delhi in a traditional Punjabi ceremony, after years of dating! Not one but two sangeet parties were in order for this couple and their loved ones – and we couldn't be more thankful! Be it the sleek and classy first party or the filmy second one – the duo and their guests rocked both! Stunning attires, makeup to-die-for and timeless style – these are some of the many things that defined their pre-wedding functions! Anania and Sahil's wedding was a page out of a fairy tale – with royal outfits and rich colours everywhere! The bride looked radiant in her gold lehenga and the groom complemented her look with an embroidered kurta and chudidaar! Every photograph reflects the oodles of love and warmth that were a part of this wedding! 

Photography by Avnish Dhoundiyal.

Golden Tulip, Chattarpur: A Delhi Wedding Venue of Luxury, Comfort and Class

Everyone wants their wedding day to be just about perfect, and of course, the wedding venue plays a major role in the turnout of events. We all know that Delhi has some of the best weddings in the country, and guess what; Golden Tulip, Chattarpur happens to be one of their prime venues! If you’ve spent hours and hours poring over the internet trying to find your dream venue, we’ve got good news – your search ends here!

The Golden Tulip hotels chain has been around since early 1960, when the first Golden Tulip hotel was opened in Netherlands. Ever since, they’ve been expanding internationally, always keeping in mind the dynamic needs and requirements of customers. 

As part of the Louvre Hotels Group, the worldwide hotel chain operates three well-known hotel brands: Tulip Inn, Golden Tulip and Royal Tulip with a total of over 240 hotels in 45 countries. Each hotel is a wonderful combination of international standards and local flavour. The result is a stay as inspiring as it is pleasurable.

Entrance to Imperial lawn

Pool-side area to host functions like mehndi

Now narrowing it down to the country and city, Golden Tulip, Chattarpur is a venue that offers luxurious comfort and an ideal ambience. The hotel stretches across 3 acres of sprawling lawns, with rooms overlooking the pool and gardens. It is equipped with state of the art banquet halls and spacious open-air as well as enclosed lawns that are ideal for weddings and social functions.

The hotel offers banquet facilities that include great natural lighting and a scenic ambience amidst splendid outdoor lawns that would make your event memorable. They have personalised, elaborate arrangements for complete wedding planning services that can be customised according to guests’ requirements. Their food quality is impeccable and hospitality matches up.  Golden Tulip, one of the most sought-after banquet halls in Chattarpur also offers accommodation for the special couple as well as their guests. 34 exquisitely designed rooms and suites overlook the pool or garden area and are tastefully done in contemporary design and all of one’s needs.

Wedding stage in banquet hall

Luxurious rooms at Golden Tulip for couple as well as guests

 

POOLSIDE BALLROOM

The Imperial Ballroom, located at the lower lobby level, boasts of 3700 sq ft area which can accommodate 300 guests. It can be converted in to three separate halls for small conferences and private social gatherings. The luxurious banquet hall is attached to the pool, along with a small porch with a waterfall that falls into the pool.

POOLSIDE BALLROOM

Imperial banquet hall seating

POOLSIDE BALLROOM

Imperial banquet hall
 

IMPERIAL GARDEN

Imperial Garden is a small lawn that has an attached pandal. The pandal is equipped with a stage. Beautiful hanging lights decorate the venue and create a lovely ambience.

IMPERIAL GARDEN

Lush lawns that are ideal for outdoor ceremonies and functions
 

IMPERIAL LAWN

This banquet hall in Chattarpur is again a combination of open and closed. It can easily accommodate around 1000 pax. It has a big pandal with beautifully designed lights. The main course can be laid inside and the stage, the live counters and the vedi is perfect for the open.

CRYSTAL LOUNGE

It is the best suitable venue for up to 175 pax. Equipped with sofa seating and bar essentials, it is ideal for a sangeet night. Moreover, it has glass walls so guests have a beautiful view of the fountain and pool below.
 

TERRACE

In addition to that, Golden Tulip is also equipped with a lovely terrace that can be used for functions like mehndi.

 

AT A GLANCE

– Convenient location                                            –   Terrace party area

– Multiple banquet halls                                         –   Impeccable food quality

– Lush green lawns                                               –   Gorgeous décor provided by venue

– Pool side party area

 

CONTACT

Address: 242-245 – Fatehpur Beri, Asola, Chattarpur Temple Road, 110074, New Delhi

Banquet Sales Ph.: +91 9015 930 930

Telephone: +91 1171555111

Fax: +91 1171555123

Reservations: 800 358 0846

E-mail: reservations@goldentulipchattarpur.com

 

 

 

All You Need To Know About Marwari Wedding Rituals And Customs!

Marwari or Rajasthani weddings are strong rooted in culture and tradition, and so have a beautiful heritage quality about them that’s worth knowing about. The week-long wedding affair is an elaborate, regal and vibrant affair. Let’s take a look at traditional Marwari wedding rituals and customs:

 

MARWARI PRE – WEDDING RITUALS

Sagai:

This refers to the Marwari engagement ceremony. It is organised by the groom’s family. In this ceremony, a tikka is applied on the groom’s forehead and he receives gifts like clothes, a sword, sweets, etc. from the bride’s family.

Sagai:

Ganpati Sthapna and Griha Shanti Ceremony:

This Marwari wedding ritual is performed a few days before the wedding. They have a havan and offer prayers to their god Ganesha, asking him to bless the union of the couple.

Ganpati Sthapna and Griha Shanti Ceremony:

Pithi Dastoor:

This Marwari wedding ritual is similar to the haldi ceremony. Turmeric and sandalwood paste is applied to the bride and groom after which they are not allowed to leave the house till the wedding day.

Pithi Dastoor:

Mahira Dastoor:

The maternal relatives of the bride and groom present them with gifts like clothes, jewellery, etc.

Mehfils:

This Marwari wedding ceremony is usually held in the evenings and arranged separately as ‘ladies mehfil’ and ‘gents mehfil’. Stunning dresses are worn and a traditional dance called Ghoomar is performed.

Mehfils:

Mehfils:

Janev:

The groom is supposed to wear saffron robes and perform a havan. After this, he is required to wear a sacred thread called janev.

Palla Dastoor:

A day before the wedding, the groom’s relatives bring a set of gifts to the bride’s house. It consists of clothes, jewellery and other similar items that she is to wear on the wedding day.

Palla Dastoor:

 

MARWARI WEDDING RITUALS

Rajput Baraat:

Similar to other baraats, the groom dresses up royally and mounts a horse or elephant to go to the wedding venue. Nowadays, cars are used too. He holds a sword in hand and is accompanied by the wedding procession. 

Rajput Baraat:

Aarti:

Once the groom reaches the wedding venue, he is greeted and welcomed by the bride’s mother who performs an aarti. The groom is accompanied by a male member of his family.

Jaimala:

 The groom is then taken to the bride who has her face covered by a veil. They exchange flower garlands (jaimalas) and then proceed to the mandap.

Jaimala:

Granthi Bandhan:

In this Marwari wedding ritual, either the priest or the groom’s sister ties the bride’s pallu/chunni to the groom’s shawl/dupatta, symbolizing their union and eternal knot.

Panigrahan:

The groom takes the bride’s hands in his and promises to be with each other through thick and thin, come rain or shine.

Panigrahan:

Pheras:

The bride and groom take rounds around the holy fire while the priest chants Vedic mantras. In Marwari wedding rituals, 4 pheras are taken in the mandap. The groom leads two and the bride leads two. Later, 3 more are taken at the entrance.

Pheras:

Ashwahrohan:

The Marwari ritual requires the bride to put her feet on a grinding stone as a symbol of steadfastness. After this, the bride’s brother gives her puffed rice in her hands which she then gives the groom who puts it in the holy fire. He then applies sindoor on the bride’s head.

Ashwahrohan:

 

POST – WEDDING RITUALS

Bidai:

The Bidai is an emotional goodbye from the bride to her parents. As she departs, a coconut is placed beneath the wheel of the car. The groom gives a piece of jewellery to his bride.

Bidai:

Grihapravesh:

Once the newly married couple reach the groom’s house, a few more pujas take place.

Pagelagni:

The day after the grihapravesh, the bride is formally introduced to all family members of the groom who then give her gifts and bless her. Playful games are played between the bride and groom.

Pagelagni:

Pagelagni:

 

 

 

Amit & Apoorva Bhopal : Everything about this wedding was enchanting and left us starry eyed!

Apoorva and Amit's love story is no less than a fairy tale and their wedding resonates the same! The love birds, who have been together for a decade, decided to tie the knot in a fairy tale themed wedding and we couldn't be more awestruck! From the pre-wedding shoot to the reception, from the decor elements to the dresses – everything about this wedding was enchanting and left us starry eyed! Apoorva wore a gown by Christina WU for her ring ceremony and stuck to the regal Sabyasachi for her wedding lehenga! Amit looked every bit dapper in his sleek suits and complemented the beautiful bride! Feast your eyes on the magical wedding photos while we gush over their love! 

Captured brilliantly by Plush Affairs.

Venue Details:

Ring ceremony/Sangeet: Jehanuma Palace, Bhopal

Wedding: Noor-us-sabah, Bhopal

Reception: Hotel Lake View Ashoka, Bhopal

 

A Guide to Sikh Wedding Rituals, Customs and Traditions

If you’ve been following us, you may have noticed that we recently did a blog on Punjabi wedding rituals and customs. This time, we bring to you Sikh wedding rituals and customs. Let’s start off with the fact that they are not the same, though people tend to regard them as so. Sikh is a religion while Punjabis hail from the state of Punjab. As Sikhism originated in Punjab, it only makes sense that most Sikhs are Punjabi and speak the Punjabi language. Punjabis as well are found all over the country and do not necessarily have to be Sikh.
Now that we’ve got the basics covered, let’s move on to the Sikh wedding rituals and customs:

 

SIKH PRE-WEDDING RITUALS

Kurmai:

The Sikh wedding event starts off with a Kurmai or engagement ceremony.

Akhand paath: The families start off the Sikh wedding rituals and ceremonies by reading the whole Guru Granth Sahib. After this, the wedding date is fixed.

After all these rituals, both families gift present each other with gifts. The bride and groom exchange rings.

Kurmai:

Chunni Chadai:

After the engagement, the groom’s family visits the bride and his mother symbolically covers the bride’s head with a chunni. His family also gifts the bride with clothes, jewellery, etc.

Chunni Chadai:

Mehndi and Chooda Ceremony:

Mehndi and chooda ceremonies are often done together. Mehndi is when the bride gets her hands and feet decorated in beautiful henna/mehndi designs.  

Mehndi and Chooda Ceremony:
 

For the chooda ceremony, the bride’s maternal uncle gifts the bride with a set of red and white bangles that are to be dipped in milk before presenting. Golden ornaments called Kalires are tied to the bangles.

Mehndi and Chooda Ceremony:
 

Similar to the Christian bouquet toss, it is said that whichever bridesmaid the bride showers with her Kalire will be the one to get married next.

Mehndi and Chooda Ceremony:

Maiya:

A Sikh wedding ritual where the bride and groom are not allowed to leave their respective houses before the day of the wedding.

Gana:

Gana is another Sikh ritual where a red thread is tied to the bride’s left and groom’s right hand. It is said to be sacred and protect them from bad omens.

Gana:

Vatna:

This is similar to the Hindu Haldi ceremony. A paste of turmeric powder and mustard oil is applied to the bride and groom before the wedding for a natural glow.

Vatna:

Gharoli:

In this Sikh wedding ritual, holy water is brought from the Gurudwara and the bride and groom are to bathe with this water. The water is to be brought by the sisters-in-law of the couple in an earthen pot (gharoli).

Gharoli:

Gharoli:

 

SIKH WEDDING RITUALS

Baraat:

After the groom is dressed in his wedding attire, he proceeds to the wedding venue. He is accompanied by his wedding procession consisting of close friends and family members who dance and sing along the way to the venue.

Baraat:

Milni:

This is a Sikh wedding ritual where the bride’s family welcomes the groom as he reaches the wedding venue. They offer the groom gifts and money. Often, they exchange garlands.

Anand Karaj:

This refers to the main Sikh wedding ceremony. Anand Karaj translates to ‘blissful union’.
The families go into the Gurudwara to attend the Kirtan which is a set of religious songs that are sung.  A guru granth sahib, the holy book of the Sikhs is brought out and the priest at the Gurudwara then recites ardas (a set of prayers) while the bride and groom are seated.

Anand Karaj:

Anand Karaj:

Anand Karaj:

Laavan Pheras:

Laavan are the four prayers that seal the marriage.
The bride’s pallu and the groom’s shawl/dupatta are tied together as a symbol of unity. They then take rounds around their holy book, the guru granth sahib as the laavan is chanted. The groom leads the rounds holding a Kirpan (sword).

Laavan Pheras:

They exchange garlands and are then considered married.

Karah Prasad:

A ceremonial sweet is offered to the guests. The sweet is either made by the bride’s family or by the gurudwara in a certain method and is blessed and considered holy.

 

SIKH POST-WEDDING RITUALS

Reception:

An event that takes place to celebrate the newly married couple and their married life in the future. Food and drink is served and a lot of entertainment takes place.

Doli:

This is when the bride bids an emotional farewell to her family and proceeds to her husband’s house. As she departs, she throws a handful of rice backwards towards her mother, symbolically thanking her family for bringing her up and trying to repay them.
It is called doli as in earlier times, the bride was carried to the groom’s house in a wooden structure called doli.

Doli:

Pag Phere:

When the couple visits the bride’s house for the first time after the wedding, they receive a warm welcome with gifts and an elaborate meal.

 

 

 

Traditional Jain Wedding Rituals and Functions That’ll Capture Your Interest!

What we love about Jain weddings is the combination of simplicity, sanctity as well as colourful cheer of the traditional rituals and functions. Let’s take a look at them:

 

JAIN PRE – WEDDING RITUALS AND FUNCTIONS

Lagana Lekhan

This Jain wedding ritual is a small ceremony where close family members gather at the bride-to-be’s house along with a priest to decide the auspicious date and time of the wedding. Also known as determining the muhurat.

Sagai

This Jain wedding function is similar to an engagement ceremony. A puja is conducted at the groom’s place where the bride’s brother applies a tikka on the groom’s forehead and offers him gifts like clothes, money, sweets, etc. 

Sagai

Lagana Patrika Vachan

This Jain wedding ritual takes place during the sagai. After the lagana lekhan, the information of the date and time of the wedding is sent to the groom’s house. After he performs the Vinayakyantra puja, the priest reads out the auspicious lagan patrika for all to hear.

Mada Mandap

Yet another Jain pre-wedding ritual. This ceremony is held separately in both the bride and groom’s houses. It involves a few sacred pujas that the priest conducts.

Mada Mandap
 

 

JAIN WEDDING RITUALS AND FUNCTIONS

Baraati and Aarti

This refers to the groom’s procession on the way to the wedding venue. The groom is accompanied with people singing, dancing and celebrating along the way.

Once they reach the wedding venue, the groom is greeted by the bride’s brother who applies a tikka on his forehead and the groom does the same. The bride’s brother also presents him with more gifts. Married ladies perform aarti and sing mangal geet.

Baraati and Aarti

Kanyadaan:

The father of the bride performs the kanyadaan ritual: He places 1 rupee and 25 paise along with rice in his daughter’s right hand and then gives her hand to the groom.  
While chanting the vedic mantras, the priest pours holy water on the couple’s hands thrice.

Kanyadaan:

Granthi Bandhan

In this Jain wedding ritual, a married woman ties the pallu of the bride’s saree to the shawl of the groom.

Granthi Bandhan

Mangal Pheras:

The couple then takes seven rounds (pheras) around the holy fire. During this, ladies sing mangal geet. After this, the bride is regarded as Vamangi as she becomes the better part of her husband. 
The couple then exchange garlands.

Mangal Pheras:
 

 

JAIN POST – WEDDING RITUALS AND FUNCTIONS

Aashirvad:

After the wedding rituals are complete, elders of the family come forward and give the couple their blessings for a prosperous new married life.

Aashirvad:

Sva Graha Aagamana:

When the newly married couple arrives at the entry of the groom’s house, the bride is greeted with a huge, warm welcome by her marital family. This Jain wedding ritual is called Sva Graha Aagamana. 

Sva Graha Aagamana:

Jine Grahe Dhan Arpana:

As an act of gratitude, the entire family goes to a Jain temple and gives donations, charity and offers gifts to the less fortunate.

Reception:

This is a large event held by the groom’s family to celebrate the occasion of the wedding and formally introduce the bride to family and friends. It is an event of dancing, singing and enjoying.

Reception:

 

 

Image credits: pinterest.com; Lin and Jirsa

10 Mouth-Watering Dishes to Look Out For At a Muslim Wedding

Remember that Muslim kid in school who’d bring delicious mutton biryani for lunch? Well, with every other person getting married every time you log onto Facebook, you’re not going to surprised when you see Mohammed/Ali/Kabir’s wedding invite land up in your inbox too. And since we all know one of the best things about being Muslim is all that yummy food, here’s a guide to what to expect!
Mubarak ho, on your upcoming weight gain.

 

SEEKH KABABS

Seekh Kabab refers to minced lamb meat (mutton). The ground goat meat is mixed with select spices, minced and moulded onto the skewers and cooked over tandoor or on hot tawa. Makes for a great starter at a Muslim wedding.


 
 

BOTI KABAB

Another lamb / mutton Mughlai dish that is perfect to serve as a starter. It involves the whole muscle meat intensely marinated and baked or grilled over a barbecue. Best served with some green chutney. Can be made with beef as well.

 

BHEJA FRY

Bheja refers to brain in Hindi. It is a succulent dish where the brain of the animal is removed and fried with spices and herbs. (Stop cringing)
Eaten best with roti or pav. It is popular among Muslims during festivities like Eid as well as weddings and functions.

JUST KIDDING


 

 

MURGH MUGHLAI

As the name suggests, it is a chicken dish that originated from the Mughals. It is essentially a delicious chicken gravy that is rich, creamy and flavoured with aromatic whole spices.

 

LAMB ROGAN JOSH

Yes, another lamb dish! This fiery delicacy from Kashmir is now popular all over the country. The juicy mutton pieces are cooked and packed with a blend of spices, yoghurt and other seasoning. The result is a hot, tangy curry that is perfect for the winters and eaten best with naan or ghee rice.


 
 

NALLI NIHARI  

This is another type of mutton curry. Last one, I promise!
The word Nihar originates from the Arabic word ‘Nahar’ meaning ‘day’. It was served to the kings after their morning prayers. So you know the dish is literally fit for a king. The gravy is made with slow-cooked leg pieces of the lamb along with marrow bones (nalli). It can be made with beef as well. It is sometimes served with cooked brain. (Vegetarians, stop cringing please, this blog is not for you.)

 

MALAI KOFTA

Oh look, a dish with no meat! But trust me, this one’s just as yummy…
Well…        kind of.
It involves mashed potato and paneer (cottage-cheese) balls that are deep-fried, coated in malai (cream) and then dipped in an onion-tomato gravy.

 

RUMALI ROTI / NAAN

These are basically different kinds of flatbread eaten with any of the above dishes.
Rumali: Extremely thin and transparent. Folded like a handkerchief. Hence, the name rumali. (handkerchief in Hindi)
Naan: Another baked flatbread that is soft, puffy and lightly browned. Layered with butter. Worth the guilt.


Rumali Roti

Naan
 

SHAHI MUTTON BIRYANI

Yasss, this is heaven. Did you really think I wasn’t going to include biryani?!
For all those who are unfortunate enough to not know what biryani is – A light-orange lamb and rice based dish that the Mughals were kind enough to introduce to us. Cooked in a mix of herbs, spices, nuts .etc. And meat, of course.
*Can be made vegetarian without the mutton….  (But we all know that’s no good.)

 
 

SHEER KORMA

Dessert is a must. Duh.
We all know that no matter how stuffed you are, you will walk up to that dessert counter, note the waiter’s measly serving size, and make sure you get at least two helpings of x-y-z dessert.
Well, it’s worth the effort at a Muslim wedding because what’s waiting for you is a super-yummy milk-based vermicelli pudding flavoured with fancy ingredients like saffron, rose water, dried dates, etc to make you feel like the king you are not.


 

 

Hope you’re all geared up for that upcoming Muslim meat fest!
Click here for Muslim wedding rituals and customs.

 

 

 
Image Credits: pinterest.com

Brajesh & Akshaya Delhi : when two people are made for each other, no distance is too far and no time is too long!

Cupid can strike anywhere and anytime and the adorable couple Akshaya and Brajesh are testimony to that! The two met on a matrimonial website and soon started falling for each other in no time, in spite of being in different countries! The two dated for almost two years before finally tying the knot last year. They still live in different countries but as they say, "Distance makes the heart grow fonder". They look forward to moving in together soon and in the meantime they cherish the little time that they manage to spend together and this is what keeps them growing stronger! Like somebody said, when two people are made for each other, no distance is too far and no time is too long! 

Muslim Wedding Rituals and Traditions to Expect At an Islamic Wedding

Muslim weddings are similar to Hindu weddings, except their rituals and traditions have different names and vary slightly. Also, unlike Hindus, they do not have any auspicious time to get married and choose a date that is most convenient to the bride and groom. Let’s take a look at all of their rituals:

 

MUSLIM PRE – WEDDING RITUALS

The Mangni ceremony:

This is kind of like an engagement ceremony where the bride and groom exchange rings. The groom’s family presents the bride with new clothes.

The Mangni ceremony:
 

The Manjha ceremony:

This Muslim wedding ritual is similar to the haldi ceremony. The bride wears yellow and is anointed with turmeric paste that is given by the groom’s family. It is said to bring a natural glow to her skin. After this, a married friend accompanies the bride everywhere until the wedding. It is a celebration with lots of singing and entertainment.

The Manjha ceremony:

The Manjha ceremony:
 

The Mehndi ceremony:

This Muslim wedding ceremony is done a day or two before the wedding. It is mainly a ladies function where the bride’s hands and feet are adorned with mehndi/henna. Again, a lot of singing and dancing takes place. After this event, she is expected to not leave her house until the wedding.

The Mehndi ceremony:
 

 

MUSLIM WEDDING RITUALS

Arrival of the groom:

The groom goes to the wedding venue on a horse or in a car and his family and friends accompany him throughout the way. The lavish procession consists of dhol beats, music and dancing. The groom and his family come with gifts for the bride. On his arrival, the groom and the brother of the bride share a drink of sherbet (juice).

Nikaah:

This is the main wedding ceremony among Muslims. Sometimes, the bride and groom are made to sit in different rooms or with a curtain drawn between them. The quazi (priest) asks the bride if she agrees to marry the groom. The groom is asked the same.

Mehar is money that the groom’s family is supposed to present the bride with at the wedding day. The amount is decided and mehar is offered.

Once they agree, they are made to sign a document with a set of terms and conditions. After he proposes and she agrees, the groom is taken to the women’s section where he gifts money to the sisters of the bride. Elders then gift the couple and bless them.

Nikaah:

Nikaah:
 

Dinner is served separately to men and women. After the lavish first meal, the bride and groom and seated together with a scarf covering their heads and are made to read prayers. The Quran is kept between them and they are only allowed to see each other through mirrors. This is called aarsimashaf.

Nikaah:
 

 

POST – WEDDING RITUALS

Rukhsat:

This Muslim wedding ritual refers to when the bride bids farewell to her family. The father of the bride gives her hand to her husband, asking to protect her always.

Rukhsat:
 

Welcoming the bride:

When the bride is to enter the groom’s house, the groom’s mother holds a Quran over her head as she crosses the threshold of the front door.

Chauthi:

Four days after the wedding, the bride visits her parents’ house. She is greeted with a grand welcome.

Walima:

This Muslim wedding function is the reception after the wedding that is hosted by the groom’s family. It is a cheerful occasion where friends and family are invited to celebrate the bond among two families.

Walima: